News

The VMC has launched an electronic referral portal, rVetLink from IDEXX, and laboratory information request portal, Core One from Trace First to improve access for our referral partners. 

Please note: Face masks are required before entering Veterinary Medical Center hospitals. Farm and Equine Hospitals only providing curbside service at this time. See details below. Thank you for your cooperation and for helping to keep everyone safe!

The Hospital for Companion Animals and our Dublin urgent care service are allowing limited access to the hospitals, while our farm and equine hospitals remain drop-off only

Further information about what you can expect during your visit is provided below:

Ophthalmology exams now available at VMC-Dublin

Ohio State’s Veterinary Medical Center- Dublin adds specialty service

Beginning July 16, the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center in Dublin will offer pets in need of specialty eye care greater access to board-certified, veterinary ophthalmologists, due to the expansion of our service beyond our campus location to our Dublin facility. This service expansion complements the recently expanded orthopedic surgery service within the Dublin facility.

 

equine radiology technologists and registered veterinary technicians in radiology at Ohio State

National Radiologic Technology Week occurs annually in November, commemorating the discovery of the x-ray by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on Nov. 8, 1895. This discovery led to his winning the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901. This year, during the week of Nov. 8-14, we celebrate and salute the valuable contributions of radiologic technologists, technicians, assistants and radiation therapy professionals who play a vital role in large and small animal patient care at the Veterinary Medical Center.

veterinary pharmacy at Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center

The Veterinary Medical Center’s pharmacy team plays a vital role in the advanced level of care offered throughout our hospitals. Our pharmacists and technicians ensure that all medication use is optimal, safe and effective for all patients at all times. The team fills an astounding number of prescriptions annually – approximately 55,000 - for clients of the medical center, including inpatient and outpatient orders for all companion (dogs, cats), farm and equine patients.

Registered veterinary technicians are trained, licensed and registered to work under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian to assist in special procedures and patient care. Their role is very similar to the role nurses serve in human healthcare. Some of our technicians also have additional training and certification in a specialty field of veterinary medicine. Veterinary assistants assist the technicians and veterinarians in providing care to patients.

During the week of October 5-9, the Veterinary Medical Center celebrates Customer Service Appreciation Week in honor of the men and women who comprise our customer service teams:  hospital front desk team members (Companion, Farm, Equine and Dublin), our call center team, our servcie and lobby liaisons, our medical records team, our social worker (Honoring the Bond), and our parking attendant. We also salute our Veterinary Assistants, for their tireless work behind-the-scenes within the clinical areas of each of our hospitals in support of our patients and care teams.

In an effort to ensure a safe environment for all animal owners, visitors and VMC team members, we ask that you please avoid visiting our hospitals if you are currently experiencing flu-like symptoms, including a fever greater than 100.4 degrees and a cough, or if you or someone you have been in contact with have travelled to an affected area within the last 14 days. If your animal has an upcoming appointment, please call us and we will be happy to get you rescheduled at a later date.

MARCH 30, 2020 UPDATE:  Companion Animal drop-off drive and client parking lot open

If at all possible, in the event of an emergency, we ask that you please call ahead to (614) 292-3551.

Please note, clients are now able to park and wait in the lot outside the main entrance to the companion animal hospital on Vernon L Tharp Street.

Dublin emergency temporary closure July 1

The 24/7 emergency service at the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center at Dublin will not be available beginning July 1, 2019.  

As of July 1, ALL emergencies will be seen at our campus emergency and critical care service located at 601 Vernon L. Tharp St., Columbus, OH 43210.

In an emergency, please call (614)292-3551 until further notice.

We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.  Please note, our orthopedic surgery service is still fully operational at our Dublin facility during this emergency room closure.

Dr. Adam Rudinsky, assistant professor of small animal internal medicine at the Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine, is part of a research program at Ohio State focusing on treating acute canine colitis — diarrhea that is typically short-lived and that often resolves pretty easily.

 

Our Pet Hero Keela featured in this article about one of the clinical trials the Blue Buffalo Veterinary Clinical Trials Office is working with Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Click here for more info. 

 

While we have no confirmed cases of canine influenza virus (CIV) at the Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center, the following provides an overview of symptoms to watch for, what to do if your dog is showing signs, and preventive measures.

Symptoms of Canine Influenza Virus (CIV)

There are two strains of the virus, H3N8 and H3N2. Symptoms resemble those of “kennel cough.”

Watch for coughing, nasal and eye discharge, sneezing and fever (104-105oF).

Other more serious symptoms include lethargy, or not drinking or eating.

tThe Orthopedic Surgery service within the Veterinary Medical Center Hospial for Companion Animals and our Dublin facility are evolving to provide patients broad access to preeminent veterinary orthopedic care.

 

With the spring season upon us, more flowers are making their way into the household. Flowers are known for sprucing up the environment, and less known for posing a significant threat to pets. One of the deadliest flowers a cat owner can bring into their home -despite its beauty- is the lily.

Residencies to be renewed and expanded to four major institutions.

New York, NY - The American Kennel Club, the world's largest purebred dog registry, the Theriogenology Foundation and the AKC Canine Health Foundation announce that the recently established American Kennel Club/Theriogenology Foundation Companion Animal Residencies in Theriogenology are being renewed and expanded to four universities in 2016.  Read more.

Beginning on the evening of March 2, 2016, as part of our lobby reconstruction, the main entrance to the Hospital for Companion Animals, as well as the client parking lot directly out front of the building will be closed to all traffic and visitors. Non-emergency clients will need to park directly across the street (Vernon L. Tharp) from the Hospital for Companion Animals and enter through the Hospital for Farm Animals doorway. Directional, way-finding signage will be posted along Vernon L. Tharp Street.

Phoebe the cat during her recovery after she was treated for lily poisoning.

When Phoebe, a 23-month-old cat from Missouri, took a few nibbles of a lily plant, her owners didn’t think a thing. Unfortunately neither Phoebe nor her owners were aware of the dire consequences that would ensue.

Lilies are highly toxic to cats when ingested, and if not treated immediately can be fatal in as little as 72 hours. Lily poisoning, particularly from plants of the Lilium or Hemerocallis genera, causes rapid kidney failure.

Canine influenza outbreak

A canine influenza outbreak has been reported in the Chicago area. This is a new strain of virus - H3N2 - previously seen only in Asia, according to a report from Cornell University.

Lottie and Dr. Guiot were interviewed on 10TV about her recent total elbow replacement.  As you can see, she's good as new!  View the segment here:

http://www.10tv.com/content/sections/video/index.html?video=/videos/2015...

Ohio State veterinarians recently completed the first TATE elbow replacement in Ohio within our Dublin Veterinary Medical Center facility. TATE is a modern system that has shown the best outcomes in cases. Our surgeons were trained on this system at Michigan State University and brought the their skills and this system to Ohio. Joint replacements are utilized in pets for the same reasons that they are utilized in humans. Medications are not effective or cannot be tolerated. To see local news coverage of the story of Lottie and her elbow, please click here:

Dr. Jonathan Dyce, an associate professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences, performed a successful total hip replacement surgery on Eddie on Jan. 8, one day after his arrival. The surgery will extend Eddie’s service life and “enable me to do my job better,” said officer Rezny.