Evaluation of airflow resistance by CT scan in brachycephalic (short nosed) breeds before and after laser turbinectomy (removal of turbinate bone).

Purpose and Brief Explanation of Study:

Canine brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) is a disease of dogs with a compressed nose and face such as bulldogs, pugs, and Boston terriers. Currently, clinical evaluation of the dog with BOAS involves direct visualization of the external nose and back of the throat with surgical intervention aiming to resect obstructive tissue. Little attention is given to the effect of excessive tissue within the nasal cavity itself, even though airway obstruction is most severe within the nasal cavity. The overall prognosis for surgery is good; however, some dogs respond well to surgery and others have little clinical improvement. 

There is no non-invasive method available in veterinary medicine to objectively assess if a reduction in airflow resistance is accomplished by current surgical techniques. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novel computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative index of airflow resistance in brachycephalic dogs before and after surgical intervention including the ablation of nasal turbinates.

Objective of the trial:

The aim of this study is to evaluate a novel computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative index of airflow resistance in brachycephalic dogs before and after surgical intervention including the ablation of nasal turbinates.

What qualifies my cat for enrollment in this in this trial?

English bulldogs and French bulldogs with BOAS severe enough to warrant surgery will be considered for this clinical trial. The bulldog should be a minimum age of 8 months with no previous surgery airway surgery. The bulldog should be healthy enough to undergo a non-intubated CT at the discretion of the attending doctor (Dr. Ham).

What does enrolling my dog in this clinical trial involve?

Your dog’s health condition will be evaluated, including a brief review of your dog’s medical history and a thorough physical examination. Blood will be drawn to measure your dog’s red blood cell levels.  If your dog qualifies, they will receive a sedative and have an intravenous catheter placed. Thorax radiographs will screen for pneumonia prior to surgery. The CT scan will be performed with the dog resting comfortably on their chest under light sedation. Once the CT images are acquired, your dog will undergo anesthesia and have airway surgery performed by a veterinary surgeon skilled in this technique. Your dog will be hospitalized after surgery to ensure a complete post-operative recovery and then will be discharged once the clinician has approved. Your dog will return approximately 21 days after discharge for a recheck and a repeat sedated CT scan and nasal endoscopy to evaluate the effect of the surgery on measured airflow resistance. A second recheck will be scheduled for 90 to 110 days after the surgery for a recheck and a repeat sedated CT scan and nasal endoscopy.

Client Compensation

The total costs over the three visits will be $2,836.75. The study will pay for all charges associated with the CT scans (e.g., exam fee, blood work (PCV and TP), sedation, scanner time, radiographic interpretation), anesthesia ($264) during the airway surgery, and will provide a credit of $300 toward the surgical costs themselves.

Cost of the rhinoscopy and laser ablation is covered by the study. The results of the CT scan will provide you with an overall assessment of your dog’s airway and benefit our understanding of brachycephalic airway syndrome.

Any costs associated with the surgery above the credit and any complications from the surgery remain your financial responsibility.

Client Contact

If you believe your pet may be eligible to enter this study, please click here to fill out a questionnaire. 

Dr. Eric T. Hostnik, Hostnik.1@osu.edu