News

Throughout the five years of her service, Sofie assisted over 200 veterans and spent thousands of hours in ER's hospital rooms, half-way houses, homes and wherever she was needed. 

The Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) now offers a mobile ultrasound service to referring veterinarian practices located within a 30-mile radius of Ohio State. Scheduling is available Monday through Thursday through our referral coordinator. Exams will take place between 9 am-2pm. Animals will need to be dropped off at your practice prior to 9 am.

Please call 614-292-0950 to schedule.

The Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue chose the name “Turner” for a horse they found in need of a necessary corrective surgery because they were able to help him “turn the page” to a new chapter of his life.

When you encounter William Bradfield for the first time, you are met with a 154-pound Black Russian Terrier ball of fur and love. He is a bit slower now at the age of 8, but you would never guess that at one time in his life he was having one to two seizures per day.

For pet-owner and University of Michigan graduate Chad Williams, the love he possesses for his dog, Gracie, represents the strong, everlasting connection between animal and human.

Orthopedic service scheduling FAQS/SurgeryTeamBiographies

 

I am writing to inform you of exciting changes in the small animal orthopedic service at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center.

 

We are happy to announce we have been named the #1 veterinary hospital by the The Columbus Dispatch Top Picks of Columbus.

 Good Samaritan Fund  makes it possible for us to provide the best veterinary care to the pets with the highest need.

The Orthopedic Surgery service within the Veterinary Medical Center Hosptial for Companion Animals and our Dublin facility are evolving to provide patients broad access to preeminent veterinary orthopedic care.

May 19, 2016

Blue Buffalo Company has announced that it will award a $6 million gift to establish the Blue Buffalo Veterinary Clinical Trials Office at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Veterinary orthopedic surgeons from specialty referral hospitals across the United States attended the inaugural “Advancements in Canine Total Hip Replacement” continuing education workshop at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) last weekend.

Dewey: Back in Action

After their dog, Dewey, suffered a urinary tract infection and kidney removal, Dan and Kim Orr were ecstatic with his recovery, and couldn’t be happier to have him back home.

 

Dr. Jeanette O’Quin, clinical assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and Dr. Laurie Millward, assistant professor in Veterinary Clinical Sciences, were guests on the WOSU show “All Sides with Ann Fisher” to discuss Canine Distemper and pet wellness.

Click here to listen to the full show.  

May 23, 2016

Ohio State veterinary oncologists create unique clinical research collaboration for studying sarcoma 

A new collaborative research program pairs oncologists who treat childhood and adult sarcomas with veterinarians who manage the same cancers in canine patients.

The ultimate goal, says director Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, is to speed up the pace of translational research discoveries and new treatments for sarcoma, a diverse group of cancerous tumors that occur in soft tissue or bone.

At a whopping 22 pounds, Bauer Hazen doesn’t look like he could handle much. However, similar to his namesake, Jack Bauer, from the popular television show “24”, Bauer is a force to be reckoned with.

Amy and David Taylor bought Jaylyn from a farm in Wisconsin in 2013. During that summer, she was shown at the Kentucky State Fair where she placed sixth in the state within her class and took home the Junior Champion title at their local county fair.

When Cindy met Bob ten years ago, she was already a strong advocate of the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center (VMC).  When she moved from Chicago to Columbus in 2003, her first task was to find a kitty cardiologist for her two Persian cats, Princess and Jackson who passed by 2009.  Ohio State was the natural choice.  So when she met Bob and his three cats - Plaid, Fluffy (Plaid’s biological sister) and Sebastian -  she introduced him to the VMC.

May 24th, 2016

Dr. Cheryl London discusses how research on pet osteosarcoma could someday help children with the same disease

August 25, 2016

A new collaborative research program pairs James experts who treat certain kinds of bone and tissue cancers, called sarcomas, with OSU veterinary experts who manage the same cancers in canine patients. The goal of the program is to discover effective sarcoma treatments that can be gotten to patients – both human and canine –faster, resulting in even more improved outcomes.

 

July 15, 2016

From a cancer diagnosis to a remarkable recovery to his final days, Marley the chocolate lab never failed to make an impact on those around him. When enrolling Marley in a clinical trial eased veterinary bills, his owners decided to show their gratitude.

Please be aware of changes to the autopsy and deceased animal drop-off procedures that will go into effect on Monday, June 27. The changes include the following: - Requests for autopsy must include a referral by a veterinarian. These requests can no longer be made solely by a client. - Deceased animal drop-off times are being limited to 8 am – 4 pm M-F and 8 am – noon on Saturdays.

Only three veterinary hospitals in the U.S. offer capsule endoscopy, including Ohio State's VMC. By utilizing a 1 ½ cm pill that encloses a compact, high-resolution camera, veterinarians can now fully analyze an animal’s gastrointestinal (digestive) tract.

The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) is pleased to announce the creation of our Integrated Oncology Service. We proudly join only two other veterinary colleges in the United States in providing this patient and family benefit-centered service to referring veterinarians. For more information, click here.

 

The wild horse and burro (a small donkey) population has surged to an unprecedented 67,000. Drs. Marco Coutinho da Silva & John Lannutti are collaborating in an effort to curb this overpopulation, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Losing a beloved pet is never easy. We oftentimes ponder how lovely it would be to see our pet again, and reminisce on photos and videos that remind us of our love for them.

But some pet owners, such as Jennifer and Steve Trotta, take it one step further by cryopreserving the animal’s eggs or semen while they’re still alive.

With the spring season upon us, more flowers are making their way into the household. Flowers are known for sprucing up the environment, and less known for posing a significant threat to pets. One of the deadliest flowers a cat owner can bring into their home -despite its beauty- is the lily.

Residencies to be renewed and expanded to four major institutions.

New York, NY - The American Kennel Club, the world's largest purebred dog registry, the Theriogenology Foundation and the AKC Canine Health Foundation announce that the recently established American Kennel Club/Theriogenology Foundation Companion Animal Residencies in Theriogenology are being renewed and expanded to four univiersities in 2016.  Read more.

Beginning on the evening of March 2, 2016, as part of our lobby reconstruction, the main entrance to the Hospital for Companion Animals, as well as the client parking lot directly out front of the building will be closed to all traffic and visitors. Non-emergency clients will need to park directly across the street (Vernon L. Tharp) from the Hospital for Companion Animals and enter through the Hospital for Farm Animals doorway. Directional, way-finding signage will be posted along Vernon L. Tharp Street.

Phoebe the cat during her recovery after she was treated for lily poisoning.

When Phoebe, a 23-month-old cat from Missouri, took a few nibbles of a lily plant, her owners didn’t think a thing. Unfortunately neither Phoebe nor her owners were aware of the dire consequences that would ensue.

Lilies are highly toxic to cats when ingested, and if not treated immediately can be fatal in as little as 72 hours. Lily poisoning, particularly from plants of the Lilium or Hemerocallis genera, causes rapid kidney failure.

As you may know, last September we broke ground on our Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) Enhancement and Expansion project, a critically important addition and renovation to our VMC. 

Fox28 provides a sneak peek of the new ICU

Fox28's Good Day Marketplace crew got a sneak peek of the brand new Intensive Care Unit located in the Hospital for Companion Animals. They also interviewed the new Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Rustin Moore, and learned about the new MRI for animal patients of all sizes. View the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAF8Yo26jM4&index=1&list=PLVJHjLYVOrAgW5A1FxMC3FBOXESe9WO21

Cristia Iazbik, the Veterinary Medical Center's animal blood bank manager,surrounded by her canine donor friends.

Cristina Iazbik, animal blood bank manager at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center, was recently interviewed by the onCampus newspaper for their 2015-2016 Resource Guide for a cover feature article focusing on Buckeyes holding unique campus jobs. Read more: http://oncampus.osu.edu/nobody-else-like-me/

Blue Moon, a cria who was born prematurely and treated at the VMC

Spittin’ Creek Llamas and Alpacas brought Blue Moon, an adorable cria, to the VMC when she was born 29 days premature. Blue Moon came in recumbent, with a poor suckle reflex and failure of passive transfer. Upon arrival, she was given a plasma transfusion, IV fluids and a broad-spectrum antibiotic. After receiving intensive care for four days in the Hospital for Farm Animals, Blue Moon was discharged and acting like a normal cria. Her prognosis looks good. Thanks also to Angela Graham, Kristin Bertini, and the Large Animal ICU staff for milking Prominence every two hours to feed Blue Moon.

May 11, 2015

Thirteen diverse speakers from The Ohio State University gave talks surrounding "The Human Narrative" on Feb. 14 at the Wexner Center for the Arts' Mershon Auditorium for TEDxOhioStateUniversity, an independent TED event.

May 11, 2015

Thanks to all our patients who contributed to advancing cancer research for dogs and people. 

March 12, 2015

Dr. Cheryl London was featured in a segment on Channel 10 that is part of the series, “Toward a Cancer-free World,” which is a partnership with The James. 

Now Available! On-Site MRI for Companion Animal, Farm Animal and Equine Patients

As of May 2015, the Veterinary Medical Center’s (VMC) campus location now offers on site MRI services! Although we have had access for the past several years to a 3 Tesla magnet for companion animals (through a collaboration with Ohio State’s Wright Center for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging), this new MRI provides state-of-the-art MRI diagnostics at our Columbus location for companion, farm and equine patients.

In May, a lab mix puppy named Zelda was brought to Rascal Animal Hospital and Emergency Care with two broken legs. Veterinary staff at the hospital suspect that Zelda was abused by her previous owners, as they were forced to bring her in after reports of a dog with severe injuries.  Read more here: https://vet.osu.edu/vmc-news/puppy-two-fractured-legs-undergoes-surgery-vmc

Good Day Marketplace visited The Galbreath Equine Center on April 29th to interview Dr. Teresa Burns and Dr. Jonathan Yardley about the advanced equine veterinary services available here.  Take a look.

http://www.myfox28columbus.com/news/features/good-day-marketplace/storie...

Canine influenza outbreak

A canine influenza outbreak has been reported in the Chicago area. This is a new strain of virus - H3N2 - previously seen only in Asia, according to a report from Cornell University.

Brooke Burton discovered Dennis, a 6-year-old miniature dachshund, in 2013. Dennis had been in the care of Burton's relative, who had been over-feeding the dog with an extremely unhealthy mix of human foods, leaving Dennis at a shocking 56 pounds. He could barely walk.

As part of our continuing effort to be a helpfulextension of your practice, The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) will soon be providing a dialysis program utilizing the PrismaFlex dialysis system.

Did you know horses need routine dental care just like people?  Equine dentistry is about more than “floating” sharp teeth. This only addresses one of many problems that can be going on inside the depths of your horse’s mouth.  Equine dentistry has evolved from a bucket of water and hand float.  We currently focus on providing a thorough dental exam and only float teeth when needed.  Without a proper exam, small changes can go undetected and turn into big problems.  This happened recently with a stallion seen by Equine Field Service:

Lottie and Dr. Guiot were interviewed on 10TV about her recent total elbow replacement.  As you can see, she's good as new!  View the segment here:

http://www.10tv.com/content/sections/video/index.html?video=/videos/2015...

Now is the time to think about preventive health care, spring vaccines, Coggins tests, dental exams, and fecal floats, to keep your horse healthy. Last year four Ohio-based horses died from Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), a fatal disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. In addition, horses in Knox County (Central Ohio) succumbed to West Nile virus infection - a disease also transmitted by mosquitoes. So be aware: even if your horse never leaves the farm, mosquitoes can travel great distances and infect your horse.

As part of The Ohio State College of Veterinary medicine, The Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center veterinarians have access to the most advanced technology, discoveries and programs available worldwide to help diagnose and treat dogs, cats, equine and farm animals.

Ohio State veterinarians recently completed the first TATE elbow replacement in Ohio within our Dublin Veterinary Medical Center facility. TATE is a modern system that has shown the best outcomes in cases. Our surgeons were trained on this system at Michigan State University and brought the their skills and this system to Ohio. Joint replacements are utilized in pets for the same reasons that they are utilized in humans. Medications are not effective or cannot be tolerated. To see local news coverage of the story of Lottie and her elbow, please click here:

One lucky dog is home safely, thanks to observant owners and the Emergency and Critical Care staff at the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center. Tank, a 4-year-old pit-bull, had been acting strangely with symptoms such as panting and a decreased appetite. Tank’s owners Mesanique Smith and Amekia Roach began Googling his symptoms – and realized they matched ingestion of rat poison, a lethal substance for dogs. After three days of treatment in the Intensive Care Unit of the VMC, Tank was released. “We’re just glad he’s okay and coming home,” Smith said.

Did you know that 1 in 4 dogs will develop some form of cancer in their lifetime? It’s a staggering statistic, but there is hope. Through clinical trial studies at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Clinical trials represent the cutting edge of medicine: research expertise meets new treatments and improved outcomes, including an improved understanding of the diseases, like cancer, that affect our animals.

Dr. Jonathan Dyce, an associate professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences, performed a successful total hip replacement surgery on Eddie on Jan. 8, one day after his arrival. The surgery will extend Eddie’s service life and “enable me to do my job better,” said officer Rezny.

The equine field service veterinarians listed left to right, Dr. Jonathan Yardley, Dr. Bacha, Dr. Naomi Chiero and Dr. Matt Brokken. In the background is the equine field service truck that they use to make equine farm calls in central Ohio. The trucks are able to carry digital x-rays, upper airways endoscopes, the Lameness locator and a digital ultrasound. All these tools allow them to provide the most comprehensive equine sports medicine in Ohio.

Download your copy of the first Equine Field Services newsletter. Learn more about the team of veterinarians who make themselves available 24/7 to serve your horse's medical needs. The newsletter also provides important information about preventive medicine, including helpful tips on how often to vaccinate your horse(s).

Fox 28's Good Day Marketplace visited the cardiology deparment of the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center where they interviewed Dr. Brian Scansen, DVM, MS, ACVIM and Assistant Professor at Ohio State's College of Veterinary Medicine. To view the 4-minute segment and learn more about what the Veterinary Medical Center's cardiology specialists have to offer!

http://www.myfox28columbus.com/news/features/good-day-marketplace/storie...