FAQ

Q: What is the MPH program at OSU?

The Master of Public Health (MPH) degree is the standard professional public health degree, recognized throughout the world. Students enrolled in OSU's College of Public Health may specialize in one of six basic areas: biometrics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, health behavior and health promotion, health services management and policy, or Veterinary Public Health. They will take courses in each of these basic areas to provide flexibility and familiarity with all public health disciplines. As a practice-oriented degree, the MPH requires that all students also complete a field practicum designed to gain practical experience in their field of specialization, and a culminating experience determined by their specialization.

Q: What is the Veterinary Public Health Specialization?

The Veterinary Public Health specialization within the MPH program at The Ohio State University will provide students with the public health credentials to serve as leaders in zoonosis prevention and control programs in the US and worldwide. Students will gain an understanding of the epidemiology and ecology of zoonotic diseases in pet animal, livestock, and human populations. Students will also learn about animal population systems including the roles of companion and food-producing animals in society, food production and distribution systems, biosecurity programs, and intervention strategies. Upon completion of this program, students will be well-prepared for a rewarding career with a variety of industries or governmental agencies. The Veterinary Public Health specialization can also be easily tailored for students that intend to enter the professional veterinary medicine (DVM) training program at OSU or elsewhere.

Q: Who is eligible for the Veterinary Public Health Program?

Any student that has completed a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better is eligible to apply to the MPH degree program. Students should select the Veterinary Public Health specialization within the MPH program if they wish to pursue a public health career related to the prevention and control of zoonotic and foodborne diseases in animal and human populations. Specialized training in Veterinary Public Health will also benefit students that intend to enter the professional veterinary medicine (DVM) training program at OSU or elsewhere by providing expanded knowledge and training in a complimentary health sciences discipline.

Q: What classes will I take to obtain my MPH in the Veterinary Public Health Specialization?

The curriculum for the Master of Public Health degree consists of a minimum of 60 credit hours organized into five curricular domains: Core courses in areas of knowledge basic to public health (20 credit hours), courses required for the Veterinary Public Health specialization (20 credit hours), elective courses related to Veterinary Public Health (12 credit hours), practice placement (4 credit hours), and a culminating experience (4 credit hours).

The Master of Public Health degree requires that all students take at least one course in five areas of knowledge basic to public health: epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health sciences, health behavior and health promotion, and health services management and policy.

The required courses for the Veterinary Public Health curriculum will include the topics of infectious disease epidemiology, zoonotic diseases, food safety and biosecurity, as well as environmental health and related issues.

Q: Will I spend all of my time in class?

No, Veterinary Public Health students will participate in a wide variety of educational activities both on and off campus. Students will have the opportunity to directly interact, both in and outside the classroom, with recognized experts in the field of Veterinary Public Health. In addition, students will gain practical experience during an off campus practice placement. They will also have a culminating experience in which they will conduct a field research project in a relevant area of interest in conjunction with their advisor.

Q: What are some of the possible research areas in which I could work?

The Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine has among its faculty a wide range of experts with research interests related to zoonotic and foodborne diseases. They include food safety microbiologists, epidemiologists, virologists, and parasitologists. They work with companion animals, dairy and beef cattle, swine, sheep, poultry, as well as zoo animal, wildlife, and exotic animal populations.

Q: How will I use the Veterinary Public Health Specialization?

Individuals with the MPH degree and specialized training in Veterinary Public Health will be well qualified for rewarding public practice careers in both state and federal governments, non-governmental organizations, industry, and agribusiness. Potential employers include public health agencies ranging from state Departments of Health to federal agencies such as the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the US Public Health Service; as well as international agencies such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). In addition, students with specialized training in Veterinary Public Health will be competitive for public health related positions in the food processing, food service, and pharmaceutical industries. Completion of the MPH degree with a specialization in Veterinary Public Health will also help students that plan to pursue a DVM degree by providing a broader background and expanded knowledge base in the health sciences prior to entering the professional veterinary medicine (DVM) program.

Q: How long will it take me to obtain the Veterinary Public Health Specialization?

The MPH degree program at The Ohio State University requires 1.5 to 2 years to complete, depending upon the individual courses, practice placement experience, and research project chosen by the student. Students in the Veterinary Public Health specialization that are accepted into the professional veterinary medicine (DVM) program after the first year can still complete their MPH degree. These students will work closely with their advisor to complete the practice placement and field research project requirements for the MPH degree during summer quarters. The MPH degree can be awarded to these students prior to the completion of their DVM degree.