Symposium to examine emerging MRSA threat

Day-long symposium to explore the human and animal health threats posed by this emerging health problem

Columbus, OH - On Saturday, March 20, 2010 experts in infectious diseases and on MRSA in animals will convene a day-long symposium to explore the human and animal health threats posed by this emerging health problem. Health workers are aware that Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be transferred from person to person; they may be less aware of the risks posed to animals by human transmission, and may not know that animals can transfer the pathogen to humans.

Experts at the symposium will present a description of this pathogen and of other Methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, as well as offer a summary of their epidemiology and their impact on humans and animals. The symposium is targeted to both human health professionals and animal health professionals. This "One Health, One Medicine" approach to studying this pathogens offers a broader understanding of the impact of the diseases in the human health setting as well as veterinary setting.

The two featured keynote speakers are Dr. Scott Weese, recognized internationally for his work on MRSA in animals, and Dr. Paul Morley, an infectious diseases control expert. Dr. Weese will provide a worldwide MRSA update; Dr. Morley will describe handling MRSA cases to decrease the risk of diseases transmission in veterinary settings.

Registration for the symposium is available at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine Office of Veterinary Continuing Education. On-line registration requires establishing a log-in name and password. Cost for the full day meeting is $60 ($35 for students). Registration can also be mailed or faxed. A downloadable PDF of a brochure is also available. For more information and links to both methods of registration, please visit the Office of Veterinary Continuing Education web site.

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About the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State

Founded in 1885, The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine is ranked fifth in the nation and includes more than 1,000 faculty, staff and students in the Departments of Veterinary Biosciences, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, and Veterinary Preventive Medicine. The Veterinary Medical Center is one of the largest specialty referral centers in the world, with more than 35,000 farm, equine, and companion animal patients each year. A nationally-recognized ambulatory practice and teaching unit in Marysville, Ohio provides farm animal experience to every veterinary student, and the Food Animal Health Research Program in Wooster, OH focuses on detection, control, and prevention of disease. Located on the only campus in the country with a comprehensive medical center offering seven health sciences colleges, we admit up to 162 veterinary students per class, and offer a new comprehensive graduate program in Veterinary and Comparative Medicine as well as a unique Master’s degree in Veterinary Public Health, in partnership with the College of Public Health. http://vet.osu.edu.   

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