Headline News

College of Veterinary Medicine study advances lung cancer research

A new study led by Dr. Gwendolen Lorch, assistant professor of veterinary clinical sciences, revealed a vital factor that can lead to complications in patients with certain forms of lethal lung cancer. It was originally thought that the protein, known as a calcium-sensing receptor, did not exist in human lung tissue. However, Dr. Lorch’s research has revealed that the receptor is in fact found in normal and cancerous lung tissue.  Dr.

"Oath and Hooding" congratulates new veterinarians and alumni award winners

On Saturday, June 11, the College of Veterinary Medicine will welcome 139 new veterinarians into their chosen field at the annual Oath and Hooding ceremony, held at Mershon Auditorium, 1871 N. High St., beginning at 8 p.m. Surrounded by friends and family, students will receive their scarlet and grey academic hood as a symbol of their degree.

Shelter Medicine Club provides "Safe Summer" for pets

As students leave the university area at the end of the school year, they may need to leave their pets behind. The "Safe Summer" program offers college students the opportunity to give their pets a safe haven.

Read more about the program

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About the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State

College Celebrated Biggest Open House Ever

Nearly 3,000 people attended The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine Annual Open House. The event provided all animal lovers the opportunity to learn more about animal care and health. There were informational seminars on various topics about the many different kinds of animals veterinarians treat. The seminars and activities were designed for all ages, including the popular Children's Activity Center.

Photos are now available from the Open House.

Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center welcomes new director

Karin ZuckermanKarin Zuckerman, former Chief Executive Officer of Easter Seals of Central and Southeast Ohio, brings extensive experience working in academic healthcare and non-profit organizations to the Ohio State Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) as the new director, beginning Monday, April 11.

College maintains #5 ranking in U.S. News & World Report’s latest survey

The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine continues a trend of excellence by maintaining its fifth-place ranking among the 28 veterinary colleges in North America. The health sciences rankings were last released in 2007 and are typically reviewed every four years.

Established in 1885, The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine has led the veterinary profession for 125 years, offering cutting-edge expertise in animal care, research, teaching, and community involvement.

Dr. Linda Lord becomes state veterinary association president

Dr. Linda Lord, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine was elected president of the Ohio Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA). At the ceremony at OVMA's annual Midwest Veterinary Conference in late February, Dr. Lord formally accepted the position from the previous president, Dr. Jason Johnston of Troy.

College personnel featured in "onCampus"

One staff member and two faculty members were featured in the March 17 issue of onCampus. Rory Gaydos, VIS customer support, was the featured staff member; see his interview on page two. Turn to page three for a feature on our new fellows in the American Academy of Microbiology: Drs. Michael Lairmore and Kathleen Boris-Lawrie.

Human Animal Bond featured on "All Sides With Ann Fisher"

Dr. Jennifer Brandt, assistant director of Student Services in the College of Veterinary Medicine was interviewed on "All Sides with Ann Fisher," a live, public affairs talk show, with listener phone calls and emails, on WOSU public radio. Dr. Brandt is the founder of the Honoring the Bond program in The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center. Founded in 1998, Honoring the Bond provides a licensed social worker offering grief counseling and education services to pet owners during difficult and end-of-life decisions.

Research results published in Journal of Biological Chemistry

A cancer-causing retrovirus exploits key proteins in its host cells to extend the life of those cells, thereby prolonging its own survival and ability to spread, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) and Ohio State's College of Veterinary Medicine.