FDA approves first canine cancer therapy

Zoetis (formally Pfizer Animal Health) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given approval for Palladia, developed to treat mast cell tumors in dogs. Dr. Cheryl London, associate professor in the Department of Veterinary Biosciences and Veterinary Clinical Sciences and Thekla R. and Donald B. Shackelford Professor in Canine Medicine, has worked with Zoetis (formally Pfizer) since 2000 to help develop the treatment.

"Palladia is an exciting, new treatment option for dogs with mast cell tumors,” said Dr. London. "At the completion of a Palladia clinical study, approximately 60 percent of dogs had their tumors disappear, shrink or stop growing. Also, we determined that dogs whose tumors responded to Palladia experienced an improved quality of life."

Zoetis (formally Pfizer Animal Health) estimates 1.2 million new canine cancer cases are reported in the U.S. every year. Mast cell tumors are the second most common tumor type and are often seen as lumps in the skin. These tumors are classified as grade I, II or III, with grade III being the most severe. If not treated, they can spread to other parts of the body including lymph nodes. Palladia works by blocking the activity of key receptors important for the development of blood vessels that supply tumors, as well as receptors critical for tumor survival.

Read the full announcement from Zoetis (formally Pfizer).

Posted on June 3, 2009

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About the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State

Founded in 1885, The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine is ranked fifth in the nation and includes more than 1,000 faculty, staff and students in the Departments of Veterinary Biosciences, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, and Veterinary Preventive Medicine. The Veterinary Medical Center is one of the largest specialty referral centers in the world, with more than 35,000 farm, equine, and companion animal patients each year. A nationally-recognized ambulatory practice and teaching unit in Marysville, Ohio provides farm animal experience to every veterinary student, and the Food Animal Health Research Program in Wooster, OH focuses on detection, control, and prevention of disease. Located on the only campus in the country with a comprehensive medical center offering seven health sciences colleges, we admit up to 162 veterinary students per class, and offer a new comprehensive graduate program in Veterinary and Comparative Medicine as well as a unique Master’s degree in Veterinary Public Health, in partnership with the College of Public Health. http://vet.osu.edu.