Congratulations to Joe Esch, second-year veterinary student

First Ohio State student to become SAVMA president-elect

At the annual Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA) meeting held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in March, Joe Esch, second-year veterinary student enrolled at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine was selected as the SAVMA president-elect for 2010-2011; he will serve as president in 2011-2012.

"I think I was elected based on the future plans I outlined in my speech," he said. "I take pride in identifying interests of others. My opinion matters too, but the most important thing is to hear others' opinions. I want to identify national issues and talk with people about their concerns."

Joe has been involved in serving other students since his high school days in Springfield, MA. While an undergraduate at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, he was also involved in many student organizations. 

 I get passionate when I believe I can help make things better," he said. Last year when the SAVMA Symposium was held in Columbus, he was one of the few first year students who was involved in the planning. His goal for his presidency is to identify four to six areas of opportunity, and rather than react to problems, create a plan for the future to do better for other students.

As president-elect, he will spend time participating in meetings and phone conferences as a student representative to the AVMA. He had hoped to attend the Veterinary Leadership Experience held annually in Idaho in June. Unfortunately this annual event conflicts with Ohio State's academic calendar, which makes the university's plan to switch to semesters a positive change. He will also continue to work with SCAVMA on the local level and represent the college as a senior delegate.

"This is a tremendous accomplishment," said Dr. Lonnie J. King, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine. "We are proud of his leadership and service to veterinary medicine."

Joe was interviewed for an article that appeared in the February 15 issues of JAVMA, which explored diversity issues in the veterinary profession. The section of the story that included his interview is "At veterinary colleges, male students are in the minority."

Posted: 4/21/10

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About the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State

Founded in 1885, The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine is ranked fifth in the nation and includes more than 1,000 faculty, staff and students in the Departments of Veterinary Biosciences, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, and Veterinary Preventive Medicine. The Veterinary Medical Center is one of the largest specialty referral centers in the world, with more than 35,000 farm, equine, and companion animal patients each year. A nationally-recognized ambulatory practice and teaching unit in Marysville, Ohio provides farm animal experience to every veterinary student, and the Food Animal Health Research Program in Wooster, OH focuses on detection, control, and prevention of disease. Located on the only campus in the country with a comprehensive medical center offering seven health sciences colleges, we admit up to 162 veterinary students per class, and offer a new comprehensive graduate program in Veterinary and Comparative Medicine as well as a unique Master’s degree in Veterinary Public Health, in partnership with the College of Public Health. http://vet.osu.edu.